An accurate diagnosis can make a real difference to your patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) or Dravet syndrome1-3

Your patients with LGS or Dravet syndrome may reach adulthood without a specific diagnosis. For these patients, an appropriate diagnosis can lead to more targeted care.1,2

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A specific diagnosis can help when setting expectations and planning for future care with patients and caregivers1,2

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Treatment plans and management can be personalized to their particular conditions1,2

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Without a specific diagnosis, access to tailored treatment can be challenging1,3

Clinical features of LGS may delay or impede diagnosis

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Presentation
is variable

At onset, not all patients present with the traditional signs and symptoms of LGS2,4,5

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LGS changes
over time

Patients may present with a number of different seizure types, which change over time2

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Adolescent/adult
care complications

Details of medical history may be lost during transfer from pediatric to adult care, and characteristic EEG features may no longer be present by adulthood3,6

The classic diagnostic triad is often used for initial diagnosis2:

  • Multiple seizure types
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Abnormal EEG

However, this triad cannot be solely relied on, as symptoms can change with age6

By adulthood

~50% to 75%

of patients diagnosed with LGS during childhood may no longer display all of the clinical and EEG features typically used to diagnose the syndrome.6

Signs and symptoms vary over time

IDENTIFYING LGS ACROSS AGE GROUPS

Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) Diagnosis Chart - Identifying Symptoms Across Age Groups Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) Diagnosis Chart - Identifying Symptoms in Children Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (LGS) Diagnosis Chart - Identifying Symptoms in Adults

Other common hallmarks of LGS:

  • Persistent seizures despite trial of 2 or more antiepileptic drugs3
  • Helmet/safety precautions to prevent seizure-related injuries6

If your patient is exhibiting even some of these symptoms, you may want to reevaluate their medical history and determine if they may have LGS2

The information provided is not intended to supersede independent clinical judgment or institutional protocols.

Dravet syndrome often goes undiagnosed or can be misdiagnosed

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Despite early presentation, Dravet syndrome may not always be diagnosed as most patients present as normally developing infants with febrile seizures1,11

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At onset, patients with Dravet syndrome typically have a normal MRI and nonspecific EEG findings1

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Childhood history is not always available in older patients, which can further confound diagnosis1

Though genetic testing is available, the presence of a sodium channel gene mutation is not sufficient for diagnosis, and absence of mutation does not exclude diagnosis1,12

Signs and symptoms may vary over time

IDENTIFYING DRAVET SYNDROME ACROSS AGE GROUPS

Dravet Syndrome Diagnosis Chart - Identifying Symptoms Across Age Groups Dravet Syndrome Diagnosis Chart - Identifying Symptoms in Children Dravet Syndrome Diagnosis Chart - Identifying Symptoms in Adults

Not all patients display all symptoms—even some of these characteristics can suggest Dravet syndrome11

The information provided is not intended to supersede independent clinical judgment or institutional protocols.

References: 1. Wirrell EC, Laux L, Donner E, et al. Pediatr Neurol. 2017;68:18-34. 2. Arzimanoglou A, Resnick T. Epileptic Disord. 2011;(suppl 1):S3-S13. 3. Piña-Garza JE, Boyce D, Tworek DM, et al. Epilepsy Behav. 2019;90:148-153. 4. Bourgeois BF, Douglass LM, Sankar R. Epilepsia. 2014;55(suppl 4):4-9. 5. Arzimanoglou A, French J, Blume WT, et al. Lancet Neurol. 2009;8:82-93. 6. Kerr M, Kluger G, Philip S. Epileptic Disord. 2011;13(suppl 1):S15-S26. 7. van Rijckevorsel K. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2008;4:1001-1019. 8. Oguni H, Hayashi K, Osawa M. Epilepsia. 1996;37(suppl 3):44-47. 9. Panayiotopoulos C. In: The Epilepsies: Seizures, Syndromes and Management. Oxfordshire, UK: Bladon Medical Publishing; 2005:137-206. 10. Ferlazzo E, Nikanorova M, Italiano D, et al. Epilepsy Res. 2010;89:271-277. 11. van Dam VS, Korff CM. Schweiz Arch Neurol Psychiatr. 2013;164(5):153-157. 12. Dravet C. Epilepsia. 2011;52(suppl 2):3-9. 13. Rodda JM, Scheffer IE, McMahon JM, et al. Arch Neurol. 2012;69(7):873-878. 14. Genton P, Velizarova R, Dravet C. Epilepsia. 2011;52(suppl 2):44-49.